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HomeBusinessSeptember 2021 Sees Euro Zone Inflation Dip to 4.3%, a Record Low

September 2021 Sees Euro Zone Inflation Dip to 4.3%, a Record Low

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The annual inflation rate in the euro zone dropped to 4.3% in September, the lowest level since October 2021, according to flash figures. This decline comes after the European Central Bank (ECB) raised interest rates to a record level in September, indicating its belief that rates are high enough to bring inflation to the target in the medium term. The ECB’s projections show that inflation is expected to average 5.6% this year, and subsequently fall to 3.2% in 2024 and 2.1% in 2025. However, the recent surge in oil prices could pose a risk to these inflationary forecasts. Germany, the largest economy in the euro zone, continues to struggle with an economic contraction and faces annual price rises well above the target at 4.3%.

While annual inflation in the euro zone fell to 4.3% in September, down from 5.2% in August, concerns remain over the economic outlook. The ECB’s decision to hike interest rates to a record level was viewed as a “dovish hike,” signaling a belief that inflation can be brought to target in the medium term. The central bank’s projections suggest a decline in inflation over the coming years, with expectations of 5.6% this year, 3.2% in 2024, and 2.1% in 2025. However, the recent surge in oil prices poses a risk to these estimates. Additionally, Germany continues to grapple with an economic contraction, and its annual price rises remain well above target at 4.3%.

The inflationary situation across European nations is highly divergent. Germany, as the largest economy in the euro zone, is experiencing an economic contraction and struggling with annual price increases of 4.3%, above the target set by the ECB. Other countries are also facing varying levels of inflation. France has a headline inflation rate of 5.6%, while Spain’s stands at 3.2%. On the other hand, Slovakia and Slovenia are grappling with inflation rates of 8.9% and 7.1% respectively. It remains to be seen how these different inflation rates will impact the overall economic growth of the euro zone, which is projected to be 0.7% this year, followed by 1% and 1.5% in the next two years.

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