Home Latest News Texas homecoming queen prevented from crowning successor due to Mexican heritage stole.

Texas homecoming queen prevented from crowning successor due to Mexican heritage stole.

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Texas homecoming queen prevented from crowning successor due to Mexican heritage stole.

A former Texas homecoming queen, Kayleigh Craddock, has been barred from returning to her high school to crown her successor because she wore a stole representing her Mexican heritage at her graduation ceremony in May. The school district claims that Craddock was informed of the dress code before the graduation ceremony and was asked to comply but refused. However, Craddock’s mother disputes this, stating that her daughter was told to tuck the stole into her gown. Craddock, who is now a freshman at Sam Houston State University, expressed her pride in wearing the stole to accept her diploma and stated that she would not have worn it if she had been told it was against dress code.

The Brazosport Independent School District has defended their decision, citing insubordination at the graduation ceremony as the reason for not inviting Craddock back to participate in crowning the next Homecoming Queen. Craddock’s mother believes that she is being singled out and punished, as other students at the graduation also wore stoles. The family is disappointed and feels that they should have been informed of the school’s decision sooner. Although they have reached out to the school district, they have not received a response. With just days until homecoming, Craddock’s mother hopes that the school and district will reconsider their stance.

This incident comes after another parent in Texas, Darresha George, filed a federal discrimination lawsuit against the state for failing to enforce the CROWN Act, a law that protects against hair discrimination. In that case, Darresha’s son, Darryl, has faced suspension due to his locs violating the school district’s dress code policy. The family argues that his hairstyle should be protected under the CROWN Act because locs are historically associated with race. These events highlight the ongoing debates surrounding dress codes and cultural expression in schools.

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